Our stylishly turned out Dresser has assisted her Lady with the chemise, leggings, panniers and is now tightening the corset. The series of layers’ underneath clothing has purpose; the chemise was closest to the skin and served as nightgown, petticoat and under-blouse. The leggings provided warmth and good protection from tall grasses, low bushes and insects. Jumping to the corset, we know that it provided a particular feminine shape; a smaller waist, or larger bottom. And this, is where panniers totally take over the whole feminine shape idea; remember this famous picture of one of Marie Antoinette’s dresses …

All those Tudor bits ...

Georgain; another period to dress ...

Lauren and Abby of American Duchess demonstrate getting dress in 1740s daywear, from the "skin out," starting with the chemise, then the stays (corset), underpetticoats, and finally the outer layers. Lauren displays her 1740s Outlander cosplay outfit made from Simplicity 8161 and 8162 with additions and alterations. Abby answers questions and gives historical background on real 18th century dress.

The Medieval Lady and her many layers ...

Emily Taaffe is dressed in her 19th century costume for Daphne in 'Nation'.

Can we do up our own corsets?

A lady's clothing ensemble of the 1860s (the prices quoted are from the company that makes the costumes) ...

So ... did Victorian women dress themselves afterall?

when wearing a corset, there's an order to dressing ...

Page 1 of 2

The Costumer's Notebook,

The book The Costumer's Notebook is a 295 page comprehensive handbook for Costumers for stage and film including a full Glossary of stage and film industry terms. Sections include methods and tricks for laundry, dyeing, breakdown, Dresser guidelines and protocols for Stage or Film and various size charts for men and women from shoes to gloves. Other Sections include diagrams showing How to Iron A Shirt, How to Tie a Tie and How to Tie a Bow Tie. Costume fittings, costume lay out and costume storage are also discussed.